Justine Lois Thorpe


Where do you live?
My Studio is based in Harpenden but I’m often travelling to Devon & Cornwall for work and inspiration. It’s where I spent my childhood and I have always been fascinated with the landscape and coastline there.

Describe your work. What inspires you?
My paintings can sometimes be difficult to define because my thought process can be ambiguous. However, often it’s my curiosity to my emotional and physical connection with nature’s elements, the sea and the interaction with land and our west country

coastline, that forms a major part of my work. Initially I will sketch and paint, on location and in all types of weather, in a relatively free and spontaneous style. I will then add to these and refine them back in the studio. I usually work with oils on board applying generous amounts of oil, creating layers, which I often scrap back and work in particular ways to achieve my desired representation. This process can take time and form paintings of pure abstraction but more often works of abstract representation.

Were you always creative, since childhood?
What is your earliest memory of being creative?

For as long as I can remember I have always been drawing and painting. Even as a child, living in St Agnes, I would sketch and paint at any given opportunity. My parents remember having to constantly clean my room and clothes of splashed paints and restocking me of my seemingly insatiable demand for more crayons!My dad was a graphic illustrator and has said he recognised my creativity from an early age. He always encouraged my painting through school, college and university. Even my auntie took me to my first art exhibition at the Tate Britain to see David Hockney. This fertile grounding enabled my creativity to evolve and gave me a real appreciation of art. Artists such as Peter Lanyon, Roger Hilton and Terry Frost amongst others have had a great influence on me and my work.

What’s the best thing about being an artist?
Painting for me is compulsive. I’ve been told that I have a somewhat restless nature and find that painting is where I can truly express myself. It’s where I find my solace.It’s also extremely rewarding when your work is appreciated and recognised. I take great satisfaction in seeing my work enjoyed and understood by others.I have been fortunate in winning The Green & Stone Prize from The Chelsea Art Society on a couple of occasions and also being shortlisted in many other notable art awards and exhibitions.Every customer and commission undertaken provides me with further motivation, confidence and inspiration.I feel very lucky to be able to do what I love everyday!

What is the worst thing about being an artist?
I’m my own worst critic and can sometimes over think a painting.I can finish a day happy with my progress and then see maddening issues the next. Knowing when a piece is finished can be an art form in itself!

Anything to add?
My most memorable moment:When I was at Art College I was commissioned by St Paul’s Walden Bury to paint for The Queen Mother and personally presented her with the painting on her Birthday.

Related work


Mooring, Padstow

Mooring, Padstow

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Incoming Tide, Padstow

Incoming Tide, Padstow

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Tidalwater, Padstow

Tidalwater, Padstow

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